Wild Edibles

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(trout lily)

RAMPS

(ramps)

bloodroot

(bloodroot)

fiddleheads

(fiddlehead ferns)

garlicmustard

(garlic mustard)

This weekend, we were thrilled to go on a Wild Edibles walk with some local folks. We have a “Fresh & Feral” share with Acorn Kitchen, and part of the share is a monthly wild edibles walk – showing us plants, tasting, talking about how to harvest and prepare them. Ben has spent a few years learning about mushroom foraging, and we’ve both been wanting to learn about more wild foods. Now that we, um, have more flexible schedules, we can actually do it! Children were welcome to join the walks, and that was one thing I was most thrilled about – personally, I think this might be one of the best skills I can teach my children.
On Saturday, we saw Garlic Mustard, dandelion (brought over by European settlers as a highly valuable plant!), clover, nettles, ramps (wild onion), trout lily, Japanese knotweed, cattails, fiddlehead ferns, and bloodroot (not for eating, but a powerful medicinal). Some of these I knew, but didn’t know all the uses for, some of them I had eaten, and some I knew nothing about. I’d never heard of trout lily but it was exceptionally delicious (flowers and leaves), with a crisp, sweet cucumber flavor. Japanese knotweed is most often talked about around here as a pesky invasive, so it was really amazing to taste it (Gabriel ate at least 4 huge pieces), and to learn that its roots make a powerful tincture for Lyme disease.
We’re totally hooked – I’ve ordered lots of wild edible books and added some to our store and we’re really excited to eat more, learn more, and encourage more to grow in our own yard.

In other news this week, I spent a lot of time cleaning out our fridge, pantry, and deep freezer. Our well got contaminated by E Coli last summer, and we’re still in the process of getting it clean. I realized that all of my canning and frozen goods from last summer/fall are potentially infected, so into the compost they all had to go. A wicked bummer, but at least we won’t starve without that food, so it could be much worse.
We’re getting ready to go visit my mom in Charleston soon – I haven’t been home in over five years, and I’m really excited to eat shrimp and smell pluff mud.  I am mildly terrified that my children will throw temper tantrums mid-flight.  Cross your fingers for me.
Blessings on your week, friends.

P.S.  If you’re on Instagram, let’s connect!  I’m adrielester.

4 Responses to “Wild Edibles”

  1. 1

    I also want to learn more about wild edibles around home! There is a walk that is often organized near here but i have yet to find the time to go! snif!
    Travelling with kids tip: have a new activity for every hour of travel,I know it seems like a lot but it’s worth it! Light, quite and clean are key words! ;) have fun!

  2. 2

    Thanks for the tips! I’ve been wanting to go on a wild edibles walk for years, truly, so I understand it can be hard to make it happen. But I encourage you to make the time, it was so inspiring :)
    Blessings,
    Adrie

  3. 3
    Kimberlie Ott

    Have a wonderful visit with your family……….how exciting for you!

  4. 4

    Thank you Kimberlie :)
    Blessings,
    Adrie


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